Methotrexate can be dangerous and deadly

What is Methotrexate used for?

This medication is used to treat:

  • psoriasis
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • trophoblastic neoplasms
  • leukemias

Why was Methotrexate Recalled (or why should it be) ?

Methotrexate has been shown to decrease the number of blood cells in your bone marrow. It can cause cancerous lymphomas, tumor lysis syndrome (electrolyte imbalances), severe skin reactions, infections such as pneumonia, bone and soft tissue damage, and severe damage to your liver, kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract (some of which can be fatal).

This drug is so bad that If you are pregnant they reccomend aborting the baby because of the damage it will do. It has actually been used with other medication as an abortion pill.. If you become pregnant, call your doctor immediately. Methotrexate Will harm the fetus.

Reports in the UK show that in the last 10 years, 25 patient deaths and 26 cases of serious harm have been linked to the use of oral methotrexate. Because of the toxic effects associated with taking methotrexate, patients require regular blood tests to check for side effects. Most doctor’s do not do these tests.

What Makes Methotrexate a dangerous Drug ( side effects):

  • Way to many to even try to list but here is a few
  • Death
  • Cancer
  • Harm to a fetus
  • Infection
  • Kidney Damage
  • Liver Damage
  • It goes on and on…..

Common Misspelling or other names: Rheumatrex Amethopterin MTX mecsotrecate, mexotrecsate mexotrexade, mexotrecaste

Comments

14 Comments on "Methotrexate can be dangerous and deadly"

  1. Caroline on Fri, 2nd Apr 2010 10:12 am 

    I have been told I have to take this drug before I can be considered for another much better newer (and obviously more expensive one) I have suffered psoraisis for years.

    This is rubbish….

  2. Sherry on Tue, 6th Jul 2010 10:50 pm 

    Methotrexate has been around a long time and has proven safer than taking prescription strenth motrin on a regular basis. People have taken it for years without harmful side effects. Stop trying to scare people out of treating deadly diseases.

  3. susie on Fri, 22nd Jul 2011 11:14 am 

    I have heard that methotrexate suppresses the immune system and that is not a good thing. Rebuild the immune system with natural produce such as fruit and veg, not go harming it with lethal, toxic pills.

  4. karl on Fri, 7th Oct 2011 8:37 pm 

    do not take this drug,i was wrongly issued it and now suing the local hospital…… it is highly dangerous, the side affects are crazy, i wwould only decribe it as a living hell, saying that hell may have been better, im now off it after going private and thy found it was the wrong medication, still suffer nightmares,but i lost a yesr of my life

  5. azola on Sun, 9th Oct 2011 6:38 am 

    I’m using this drug now I’m scared that itr is dangerous!

  6. Julie on Thu, 24th Nov 2011 1:29 am 

    I have used methortrexate for the past 7 years. I go for regular blood test. I have not experiences any problems whatsoever. I laso take folic acis on a daily basis.

  7. jim on Thu, 16th Feb 2012 10:02 pm 

    I was prescribed this drug for 5 years to combat lymphoma, and have used both oral and intravenous. I experienced very serious side-effects while using methotrexate. From what I understand, methotrexate is extremely toxic to certain individuals and not to others, all based upon body chemistry. Alarm bells for the hazardous side effects are difficult to detect. My own health dramatically improved within days of refusing to use it anymore. However, I did not escape without several permanent damages. Never assume your doctor has all the facts. Many physicians (outside the academic wall) are entirely ignorant or resistant to the notion that other common drugs are much more effective and far less deleterious to a patients life than methotrexate. I would beg anyone being advised to use this drug to heavily research every alternative on your own, and return to your doctor with this list of alternatives. If you can, try to print off some evidence of the alternatives’ success. I finally found a physician worth his salt, and I have been able to start living my life again.

  8. andrea morton on Sat, 24th Mar 2012 1:16 pm 

    ive been on methatraxate for three weeks now and have had different side effects that seem to come and go headaches feeling sick very low moods ulcurs in my mouth ive tried alot of different meds for ra and phroises arthritus sorry for the spelling but ive been told i will have to stay on this meds for the rest of my life i was very scared and still am ive just had a flu and newmonerer injections

  9. debbie on Mon, 26th Mar 2012 1:00 pm 

    i am starting on methotrexate is there side affects

  10. susie on Wed, 25th Apr 2012 10:16 am 

    I had extremely bad RA and I was really crippled and in extreme pain for a few years but I refused drugs cos the side effects were obviously very dangerous. I came across a web site called drday.com and followed the plan which involves juicing carrots, apples and green leafy veg. I was mixing it with dandelion leafs, sour cherries, luckily I have a sour cherry tree in my back garden. I drink nettle tea daily which is very cleansing and I eat lots of fresh salads and veg. I gave up meat and turned vegan. Drinking lots of water and getting plenty of sunshine and fresh air. After about 9 months of doing this I was about 70 percent better and now after about two years I am about 99 percent better.This plan does not work over night but it does work. Takes several months to notice benefits but I am living proof that it really does rebuild the immune system and help heal RA. The pills such as methotrexate have terrifying side effects and I would not go any where near it. I hope that this information will help others. I have my life back without using pills and I sincerely hope that others will too.

  11. Eve Legault on Wed, 5th Dec 2012 12:37 pm 

    I’ve been taking Methotrexate since March 2012 (20 mg per week) to fight anterior Uveitis in my eyes. Does anyone else i’ve been told that this medication is good for that particular disease. I don’t like the side effect feel tired all the time.

  12. R Minocheri on Tue, 30th Apr 2013 9:10 pm 

    I have been taking Mehtotraxate for the past 12 years (20mg per week) with 10mg of Folic Acid. Have also had monthly blood tests. Can honestly say my RA has improved dramatically and no side effects have been experienced. I honestly cannot understand what all the fuss is about. I have learned that in Australia, they call it Vitamin M. Personally, I feel if it has been prescribed to you, take it. Discontinue it only when you personally feel bad with it. Do bear in mind, ALL drugs have side side effects.

  13. tony cookson on Sat, 25th Jan 2014 10:31 am 

    i have been prescibed this havnt started yet nut if its a choice between painfull joints and some of the possible side effects i will stick with the pain.
    the risks far outway the benefits

  14. Ken Linder on Mon, 7th Jul 2014 6:16 pm 

    The difficulty here has to do with an amazing lack of basic scientific knowledge on the part of most doctors. Only about 2% to 5% of doctors are

    scientists and most have very poor levels of understanding of basic biochemistry, let alone more complicated areas of medicine. What these doctors

    are are “practitioners” who act according to traditions by using drug A to treat symptom B, without any understanding of why.

    The truth is that EVERYONE who goes into an emergency room, anyone who has to take a med with known dangerous side effects in some people, and

    anyone who must take meds of any sort for a long time – MUST have a set of test done on their cytochrome P450 liver pathways.

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are essential for the metabolism of nearly all drugs, with the two most significant enzymes being CYP3A4 and CYP2D6.

    Genetic variability (polymorphism) in these enzymes often influence how well a drug works, how rapidly it works, or if it is a serious danger

    (perhaps even deadly) to a given person. Although this class has more than 50 enzymes, six of them metabolize 90% of prescription medications.
    Here are a few of the more important enzyme pathways that are involved : CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, CYP3A, CYP3A5 CYP2C9

    Each one of these has many variations and some are far most often found in certain racial groups. In the Phillipines, do to a common variation

    found in those of Phillipeno genertics, they use far lower doses of warfarin for the local population than they do for caucasions.

    A single study into the use of prescription medications in Native Americans found 67 variants in *just* the CYP2D6 system, along with 15 in CYP3A4,

    10 in CYP3A5, and 41 in CYP2C9.

    Cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2D6 is necessary for opiates to work, but it is also missing in approximately 10% of causcasions, and 35% of causcasions

    have a completly non-functional CYP2D6 allele (an allele is a genetic variation) – so that 455 who do not get5 ‘normal’ pain relief, or ‘normal’

    action of anti-depressents, blood pressure meds, etc.

    Some 7% of the poulation have a super-fast acting form of CYP2D6 which can flood their body with far too much medication too fast (deaths from

    small doses of Codein are known to occur from this). About 7-14% of the population has a slow acting form. Roughly 35% of causcasions are carriers

    of a completly non-functional CYP2D6 allele (an allele is a genetic variation), which means the drugs don’t work right and they can do a lot of

    harm (especially when these individuals are taking multiple drugs).

    Drugs that CYP2D6 metabolizes include Opiates, Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Effexor, Amitriptyline, Claritin, Cyclobenzaprine, Haldol, Metoprolol,

    Rythmol, Tagamet, Tamoxifen, and the over-the-counter diphenylhydramine drugs, Allegra, Dytuss, and Tusstat. CYP2D6 is responsible for activating

    the prodrugs codeine and other opioids into their active forms. The analgesic activity of the drugs is therefore reduced or absent in CYP2D6 poor

    metabolizers.

    A large portion of the population has one of the WILD variations (of which there are several) and most of the wild variations are poor (or

    non-functional) so drugs do not work properly in them either.

    TO make thing even worse, it has been estimated that CYP3A4 metabolizes about half of all drugs on the market *BUT* many other commonly used drugs

    are moderate-to-potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 (stop it from working right) so there are a lot of dangerous interactions, where one drug that needs

    CYP3A4 in order to work, is being blocked by another drug that slows down or halts CYP3A4 action.

    This is all very solid science, and almost no doctors know about or, or even know that there is such a thing as the cytochrome P450 system.

    The trouble is that with many MANY Cytochrome P450 enzymes being important, 6 being vital – if we only look at the CYP2D6 pathway we find that 45% of white people have no capacity to use 25% of the drugs (an important group of those drugs). Then we have 7% are very fast metabolizers (51% total so far have serious problems in just ONE enzyme) and many have wild variations – leaving only 30% or less who are even close to supposedly “normal function”.

    Yet everyone is still treated as if we are all the same.

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