Medicinal Uses of Bayberry

Bayberry

Early American’s found the bayberry tree growing throughout the East, but they used it to make fragrant candles rather than medicines. At first bayberry was used medicinally primarily in the South, where local Indians boiled the leaves and drank the decoction as a treatment for fever.

Other Names: American vegetable wax, vegetable tallow, waxberry , Bayberry, American bayberry, American vegetable tallow tree, bayberry wax tree, myrtle, wax myrtle, candleberry, candleberry myrtle, tallow shrub,

Medical Uses:

Circulatory stimulant, Bayberry plays a role in many conditions when they are approached in a holistic way. Due to its specific actions it is a valuable astringent in dysentery and diarrhea. It is indicated in mucous colitis.

As a gargle it helps sore throats and as a douche it helps in leucorrhoea. It may also be used in the treatment of colds.

Bayberry root bark contains an antibiotic chemical (myricitrin), which could fight a broad range of bacteria and protozoa. Myricitrin’s antibiotic action supports bayberry’s use against diarrhea and dysentery.Bayberry also contains astringent tannins, which add to its value in treating diarrhea.

Fever. The antibiotic myricitrin can also helps reduce fever, thus lending credence to bayberry’s use among the Choctaw Indians.

Early American’s found the bayberry tree growing throughout the East, but they used it to make fragrant candles rather than medicines. At first bayberry was used medicinally primarily in the South, where local Indians boiled the leaves and drank the decoction as a treatment for fever.

Other Names: American vegetable wax, vegetable tallow, waxberry , Bayberry, American bayberry, American vegetable tallow tree, bayberry wax tree, myrtle, wax myrtle, candleberry, candleberry myrtle, tallow shrub,

Medical Uses:

Circulatory stimulant, Bayberry plays a role in many conditions when they are approached in a holistic way. Due to its specific actions it is a valuable astringent in dysentery and diarrhea. It is indicated in mucous colitis.

As a gargle it helps sore throats and as a douche it helps in leucorrhoea. It may also be used in the treatment of colds.

Bayberry root bark contains an antibiotic chemical (myricitrin), which could fight a broad range of bacteria and protozoa. Myricitrin’s antibiotic action supports bayberry’s use against diarrhea and dysentery.Bayberry also contains astringent tannins, which add to its value in treating diarrhea.

Fever. The antibiotic myricitrin can also helps reduce fever, thus lending credence to bayberry’s use among the Choctaw Indians.

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